Vascular and Interventional Radiology

Vascular and Interventional Radiology


Vascular and interventional radiology is a medical specialty that uses imaging guidance (usually X-ray fluoroscopy or ultrasound) to perform minimally invasive procedures. These procedures are usually performed to diagnose, treat, or prevent diseases of the blood vessels, including the arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels.

Interventional radiology procedures can be used to treat a wide variety of conditions, including blockages in the arteries or veins (such as those caused by atherosclerosis), blood vessel aneurysms, deep vein thrombosis, and cancer. In some cases, these procedures can be used as an alternative to more invasive surgeries.

If you are facing a vascular or interventional radiology procedure, it is important to choose a physician who is experienced and certified in this specialty. The American Board of Radiology offers a certification in vascular and interventional radiology for physicians who have completed an accredited training program and passed a comprehensive exam.

The Benefits of Vascular and Interventional Radiology

Vascular and interventional radiology (VIR) is a branch of medicine that uses minimally invasive techniques to diagnose and treat conditions of the vascular system. This includes the arteries, veins, and lymphatic vessels. VIR procedures are often performed using imaging guidance, such as x-ray, ultrasound, or fluoroscopy.

There are many benefits to VIR, both for patients and healthcare providers. VIR can often be used as an alternative to surgery, which can be less invasive, have a shorter recovery time, and be less costly. Additionally, VIR procedures often have a high success rate and can be used to treat a variety of conditions.

The Risks of Vascular and Interventional Radiology

Vascular and interventional radiology (VIR) is a medical specialty that uses imaging guidance to perform minimally invasive procedures. VIR procedures are often used to treat conditions that affect the arteries and veins, such as blockages, aneurysms, and bleeds.

Although VIR procedures are generally safe, there are some risks associated with them. The most common complication is bruising or bleeding at the needle insertion site. Other potential complications include infection, bleeding inside the body, and damage to nearby organs or blood vessels.

What to Expect During a Procedure

When you come to the VIR Department for a procedure, our staff will work diligently to ensure that you are comfortable and have all of your questions answered. We understand that procedures can be anxiety-provoking, so we go out of our way to put patients at ease.

You can expect the following during your procedure

-A nurse will start an IV in your arm through which you will receive sedation medication.

-You will lie on a special table designed for interventional procedures.

-The radiologist performing the procedure will make small incisions in your skin in order to access the blood vessels.

-Once the catheter is in place, the radiologist will guide it to the desired location using X-ray imaging.

-The procedure will take place under fluoroscopic guidance, which means that you will be able to see the live X-ray images on a monitor.

-You may feel some pressure during the procedure, but you should not feel any pain.

-Once the procedure is finished, the catheter will be removed and the incisions closed with stitches or surgical glue.

After Procedure

After your procedure, you will be taken to the recovery room. The nursing staff will monitor you closely and make sure you are comfortable. You may have a small tube in your urinary tract (Foley catheter) to help drain urine from your bladder. You will also have a small tube (PICC line) in your arm for intravenous fluids and medications. Once you are awake and alert, you will be able to go home with a friend or family member.